Archive for the Supreme Court Category

Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Party 2012: Complete Video

Following is all the video I captured at the Independence Institute’s tenth annual Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms party. See also my previous post and my photographs.

I edited together some video of people shooting clay pigeons along with interviews with various participants.

Jon Caldara explains the purpose of the event. He says, “Freedom is not allowing people to do things that you approve of, freedom is about protecting people’s rights to do things you find distasteful.”

Dave Kopel defends the right to bear arms.

David Martosko of The Daily Caller offered the main talk of the day.

Given that Mitt Romney had just selected Paul Ryan as his running mate, I asked people what they thought about that.

Finally, Constitutional scholar Robert Natelson discusses the likely impact of the upcoming election on the course of the Supreme Court. He also says, “There’s already been a tremendous resurgence of popular understanding of the Constitution.”

Kopel on ObamaCare SCOTUS Ruling

Constitutional scholar Dave Kopel discussed the ObamaCare SCOTUS ruling July 9 at Liberty On the Rocks, Flatirons. He argued that, despite the court’s troubling ruling on the taxing power, in other ways the ruling provides important Constitutional protections of our liberties.

Kopel spoke for about an hour to a crowd of around fifty people; I extracted a series of ten videos encompassing most of his remarks.

Kopel began by discussing the commerce clause, noting that the ruling offers a relatively restrained reading of that clause more consistent with original understanding:

Next Kopel addressed the meaning of the “necessary and proper” clause, noting that the court’s ruling moved interpretation of that clause closer to original understanding:

What about Medicaid spending? Kopel points out that the Court’s ruling has profound implications for states’ ability to manage their own budgets.

Of course, the Court dramatically expanded the Congressional taxing authority, and that part of the ruling is the most problematic. Kopel discusses ObamaCare’s “Seinfeld tax on nothing.”

Did Justice Roberts make a “switch in time” because of political pressure? Kopel discusses the possibility:

What is the state of legal academia? Kopel argues that it was bad but that it is getting much better.

Is the Tenth Amendment meaningless? Hardly, argues Kopel.

Ultimately, the Constitution lives in the hearts and minds of the American people. “It is up to the American people to maintain our political system of constitutional liberty,” Kopel argues.

Judicial review is proper, Kopel argues, but not sufficient to maintain liberty.

Finally, Kopel discusses other possible legal challenges to ObamaCare.

See also Randy Barnett’s op-ed and interview about the decision.

Coloradans React to the ObamaCare Ruling

At yesterday’s rally (see my previous post), I interviewed several participants. Here’s what they had to say:

Coloradans Rally Against ObamaCare, SCOTUS Ruling

Today around two hundred Coloradans rallied at the state capitol in Denver to protest ObamaCare and the Supreme Court decision upholding the individual mandate under the Congressional taxing authority.

Read Tim Hoover’s article over at the Denver Post—then check back here for the most important information (which Hoover ignored). I refer to the talks by Dr. Jill Vecchio (shown in the photo) and constitutional scholar Rob Natelson, the video of which is embedded below.

Vecchio explained that ObamaCare forces doctors to violate the Hippocratic Oath:

Natelson, one of the leading experts on the original meaning of the Constitution, argued that the Supreme Court’s ruling constitutes sophistry:

Below are a few additional images from the rally; see my Picasa album for more. (You’ll notice that I posted the photos as Creative Commons.)

Bob Beauprez meets Vecchio:

Bill Faulkner and Jason Letman:

Felix Diawuoh, an immigrant from Ghana:

Jeff Crank, Colorado director for Americans for Prosperity (the group hosting the rally):

More soon!

Kopel: ObamaCare Mandates Unconstitutional

I caught up with Constitutional scholar Dave Kopel at the Independence Institute’s annual banquet February 16. In these two short videos, he explains why the Medicaid mandate as the individual mandate (to purchase health insurance) under ObamaCare are unconstitutional.

First Kopel argues that the Medicaid mandate violates the principles of federalism:

Next he argues that the Constitution never granted Congress the power to compel people to purchase products.

See also the complete briefs against the Medicaid mandate and the individual mandate.